5 Tips Not to Look Like a Tourist In Paris

If you want to blend in with the locals in Paris, these are the tips you need: how to dress, how to greet people, and why you need to know at least a few words of French.

caffeHow to greet someone

Start off on the right foot by greeting people with “bonjour” (hello). It’s not only polite to do when you’re introduced directly to someone, but also when you go into a shop, when you’re first approached by a waiter at a restaurant, even when entering an elevator. While this may seem a little much, it’s an important way to ingratiate yourself with the locals—and, in return, you’ll receive much better service or attention.

Do let the French person take the lead with cheek kissing, in order to avoid awkwardly misplaced lips or a shuffle of heads. You should also follow suit with the number of kisses exchanged. The general norm in Paris calls for just one kiss on each cheek, but some groups of friends have their own customs. Additionally, some regions around France follow different rules.

Do shake hands when being introduced to a formal business contact, shop owner, or concierge, unless otherwise approached by them to give you la bise.

In the evening, you should technically say “bonsoir” (good evening), though the start time of saying this is somewhat fuzzy. It’s typically said as evening starts to fall, but in summer that ends up being rather late. Still, some others start saying bonsoir as soon as they leave work; a safe bet is to begin using that salutation around 7pm. If you say bonjour during the evening, it’s better than nothing, but you might be quickly tagged as a foreigner.

Do’s and Don’t’s:

Do exchange _la bise _(a light kiss on each cheek) in social situations between women; it’s also okay between men and women.

Do not greet another man with a kiss if you’re a man; shake hands instead. Men normally don’t give each other la bise unless they are very, very good friends or family; even then it’s rare.

What to wear:

Catherine Baba.jpgTo fit in with locals, it’s best to leave behind any sweatpants, baseball caps, flip-flops and white sneakers. Parisians are generally quite stylish, but that doesn’t necessarily mean extravagant haute couture outfits—instead, think casual chic. You’ll likely see Parisian women wearing some combinations of skinny jeans, an up-and-coming designer top, Converse, or ballerina flats. Parisians also love their trenchcoats (which they call le trench) and blazers, and wearing a long scarf will also help you blend in.

Fanny-packs or large colorful backpacks are a dead giveaway for tourists; if the latter is necessary, keep it more on the discreet side. Another option is to pick up a very Parisian Longchamp bag, a nice leather purse, or a chic bag designed for men. Lastly, while you might be tempted to purchase a beret while you’re here, unless you’re planning on playing petanque with elderly gentleman, you should save it for back home.

How to walk and talk:

Parisians walk with a purpose, but that doesn’t equate to a race through the streets; rather, they walk at a steady but determined pace. It’s good form to walk on the right side of the sidewalk (this also applies to escalators), but on busy streets it can be a bit of a free-for-all. If you need to look at your map, “pull over” and consult it to the side of the road instead of in the middle of the sidewalk: this will save you from the evil stares, huffs or nudges of your fellow pedestrians.

Contrary to some stereotypes of Mediterraneans, Parisians are very soft speakers. Speaking loudly in public is frowned upon, but it can also make you stand out as a tourist and thus lead to unwanted attention, particularly from pickpockets.

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Learning the local language:

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It’s polite to learn a few key phrases in French; this will earn you the respect of locals, and help you in the end. As mentioned above, the friendly bonjour is essential. Other key expressions include au revoir (good bye), _merci (thank you), s’il vous plait _(please) and l’addition (the bill). One thing not to do: Hail your waiter by saying garcon! If anything, it will likely encourage a waiter to take his sweet time in actually bringing you the bill.

Luxembourg Gardens – Photo Essay

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A warm-weather oasis that offers the simplest of pleasures, the Luxembourg Gardens provide ample green space for relaxing, sun-soaking in Paris and people-watching. When the city bustle becomes too overwhelming, meander around the paths and formal gardens, or just relax with a picnic. Kids can float sailboats at the Grand Basin, ride ponies or take a spin on the merry-go-round. Adults might delight in the on-site Musee du Luxembourg, the first French museum that was opened to the public.

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People watching (chilling)
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People watching (next time I pose like him)
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Young photographer here

 

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The Gardens also have sports courts, including basketball and baseball, but travelers say the best way to unwind here is to just kick back and admire the surrounding scenery. You’ll find Luxembourg Gardens in the 6th arrondissement (neighborhood), just a short walk from both the Odéon (line 4 and 10) and Notre-Dame des Champs (line 12) metro stops. You can tour the garden for free but there is a fee to enter the Musee du Luxembourg.

 

Best way to see Mont Saint-Michel from Paris

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Rising out of the sea in the Baie de Saint-Michel on the coast of Normandy, the island of Mont Saint-Michel and its magnificent abbey are among France’s most striking sights. The Abbey of Saint-Michel, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, perches on the highest point of the rocky islet. Looking like a fortified castle surrounded by ancient walls and bastions, it is one of the most awe-inspiring Gothic churches ever built.

Mont Saint-Michel

Abbaye du Mont Saint-Michel

Known as “La Merveille” (“The Marvel”), the Abbey of Mont Saint-Michel is truly a marvel of medieval architecture. Since the Middle Ages, this ultimate pilgrimage site has also been called “The Heavenly Jerusalem” and “Pyramid of the Seas.” Soaring to a height of 155 meters above the sea, the abbey is an amazing feat of construction. It is even more miraculous considering the difficulties of bringing building materials across the Bay of Saint-Michel; many perished while attempting to cross the bay’s sandy shores during unforeseen riptides. In spite of great technical challenges, the abbey was built between the 11th and 13th centuries in exquisite Gothic style.

Although getting to this remote setting from Paris may not present the dangers it did to medieval pilgrims, it can still be a challenge. It takes about 3.5 hours to drive there and about an hour longer by train to Rennes and then by bus. With so many things to do here, you’ll want to spend at least four hours to tour the abbey’s cloister, refectory, and ramparts; have lunch; and see the extreme tides shift the landscape between water and sand. This makes a long day for a driver. A more convenient way is to join a full-day tour to Mont Saint-Michel from Paris that includes direct transportation by bus or van. Or you can stay overnight either in the village below the abbey or in nearby hotels on the mainland.

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Inside the Abbaye du Mont Saint-Michel

Mont Saint-Michel Pilgrimages

At the end of July, there is a pilgrimage across the Bay of Saint-Michel. However the pilgrimage depends on the tides. Those interested in taking this pilgrimage should check with the tourist office before planning a trip. There is also an important pilgrimage, known as the Autumn Pilgrimage, at the end of September on Saint Michael’s Day. The pilgrimage celebrates the Archangel Michael and several religious events. On the nearest Sunday to Saint Michael’s Day, a solemn mass is held in the Abbey Church. Later that day, there are vespers and an evening mass at the Parish Church. On September 29th (Saint Michael’s Day), the Abbey Church and Parish Church hold morning prayers and mass.

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Tips and Tours: How to Make the Most of Your Visit to Mont Saint Michel

Tours to Mont Saint-Michel from Paris: Enjoy the lovely Normandy landscapes while someone else drives you from central Paris on a 14.5-hour Mont Saint-Michel Day Trip that includes transportation, lunch, and a guided historic walking tour through the abbey and ramparts, as well as time to explore on your own.

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You can even relax reading a book

Getting to Mont Saint-Michel

If arriving by car, park in the parking lot which is located on the mainland two-and-a-half kilometers from Mont Saint-Michel. From the parking lot, a shuttle bus drops visitors off 400 meters from the entrance gates to Mont Saint-Michel.

If planning to arrive by foot, first inquire about the tides. It is important to pay close attention to the schedule of the tides as it is extremely dangerous to venture into the bay when the water is rising. During spring tide days, visitors must cross two hours before the tides. Also note that walking across the bay is best done in bare feet.

Official site: http://www.ot-montsaintmichel.com/en/accueil.htm

 

10 things to expect from Côte d’Azur

What to expect from Côte d’Azur?

                     

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The Côte d’Azur stretches from Théoule-sur-Mer in the west to Menton on France’s border with Italy. Along the way it takes in Cannes, Nice, Antibes and even another country, the principality of Monaco. The mention of such names evokes the sun-drenched and easy-going lifestyle on offer along the French Riviera – the alternative name for the Côte d’Azur. Whatever you call it, the “azure coast” provides all the glitz and glamour you could wish for – as well as beaches, dramatic coastal vistas, medieval villages and untamed wilderness.

 

 

 

 

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Menton
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Menton
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Menton

 

If you don’t like the crowds of summer, winter is an ideal time to visit because the warmth and light, which has attracted everyone from aristocrats to Impressionists, remains.

Where should I start?

The département’s capital, Nice.
The Hôtel Negresco is a venerable Nice institution, still favoured by the stars.
The city’s old town, Vieux Nice, is an atmospheric tangle of tiny streets lined with shutter-clad town houses and appealing restaurants. For further details contact Nice Tourism on 00 33 892 707 407, and visit http://www.nicetourisme.com.

 

 

 

​Can I feel the Riviera breeze in my hair?

Yes: time to hit the road, preferably in an open-top car. Rental car agencies rents convertibles, such as the Peugeot 307 coupé cabriolet,. You can choose from three parallel and twisting coastal roads: the Haute, Moyenne and Basse Corniches, which wend their way in a ribbon along the coast between Nice and Monte Carlo. The Haute Corniche is one of the world’s most romantic roads with sharp bends and plunging views that make you catch your breath.

 

 

 

Has movie magic survived?

Yes. The most glamorous event of the Riviera’s calendar is, of course, the Cannes Film Festival each May, when thousands descend on this city to publicise, prance and party, but most of the real action happens behind closed doors in the five-star hotels or the many sleek yachts moored in the bay.

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 Can I move like Harlow in Monte Carlo?

Yep! Somerset Maugham may have described Monte Carlo as “a sunny place for shady people”, but its hedonistic formula of sunshine, casinos, high-rise apartments, ritzy shops and a yacht-filled harbour makes for an entertaining stay You can also try your luck in one of the principality’s casinos where you can break the bank – or not.

Following hot on the heels of the film festival in May is the Monaco Grand Prix, when the streets of Monte Carlo become a racetrack for the F1 champions to battle it out towards the chequered flag.

 

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Monaco – Port Hercules

 

 

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Monaco – Port Hercules
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Monaco – Port Hercules

Some medieval magic?

The prize for the location with the deepest history goes to Eze, which occupies a magical spot 429m above sea level, just off the Moyenne Corniche and a short drive from Nice. Eze was one of the first settlements established by the Gallo-Romans. Its strategic position meant that it passed into different invading hands several times, with everyone from the Moors to the House of Savoy staking their claim. A wander around its labyrinth of streets, stopping off to visit its botanical gardens and generally soaking up the views, is a must.

 

 


I want to be alone

The Côte d’Azur may seem to be one long and crowded sun-and-champagne-soaked party, but there are plenty of places where you can get away from it all. Nine out of 10 of the Alpes-Maritimes’s one million inhabitants occupy its 120km coastal strip, so that leaves the rest – a stunning wilderness of snow-capped mountains, pine-clad valleys and undiscovered villages – to explore. A must for wildlife lovers and hikers is the u o Mercantour National Park. This diverse landscape of Alpine peaks, lakes, rivers and pine forests is home to over half of the 4,200 species of flora found in France, and fauna including eagles, peregrine falcons, ibex, chamois, wild boars and wolves. The park is also marked with 600km of walking trails.

Mercantour National Park

 

Can I head off the beaten track?

Yes, on one of France’s most spectacular railways. The Chemins de Fer de Provence. It passes through breathtaking mountain scenery and calls at several stations, such as the pretty fortified village of Entrevaux.
Or you could escape to the peaceful Iles de Lérins, just off the coast near Cannes. You can visit eucalyptus-blanketed Ste-Marguerite and St-Honorat, which is home to a monastery dating from the 11th century.

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A day at the beach?

Rocky headlands, shingle and golden sand: you can find it all on the Côte d’Azur. The Plage Mala, in Cap d’Ail, is where you’ll find the beautiful people, and where you can party and sip cocktails well into the night. On Cap d’Antibes, the Plage de La Garoupe found immortality in F Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night, and is one of the most beautiful beaches on the coast.

How do I get around?

Renting a car gives a certain amount of freedom – but in summer the traffic congestion can be horrendous. An excellent alternative is the TER (Regional Express Trains) that connect all the towns and cities on the Côte d’Azur as far as Ventimiglia in Italy. The Ligne d’Azur offers a well-developed network of buses surrounding Nice, with destinations including Vence, Grasse, St-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, Villefranche-sur-Mer and further inland.

Scent of the cote

Grasse is the capital of the world’s fragrance industry – many legendary perfumes, including Chanel No 5, were created there. Wander through fields of jasmine, tuberose and lavender at La Bastide du Parfumeur in Mouans-Sartoux on the edge of town. Opened in June, this botanical garden is filled with fragrant plants cultivated for the making of perfume. It opens 9am-5pm daily from October to March, 9am-6pm in summer. Most of the perfumeries are open to visitors, and Parfumerie Galimard, Parfumerie Fragonard, and Parfumerie Molinard, offer free guided tours in English. They also offer the chance to create your own perfume.

 

 

 

On the trail of the artists

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“What I shall bring back from here will be softness itself, white, rose and blue all wrapped up in this magical atmosphere” – so said Claude Monet when he arrived in Antibes on the recommendation of Guy de Maupassant. Monet was just one of many artists who flocked to the Côte d’Azur to try to capture on canvas its elusive “luminosity”.
A new route, The Painters of the Côte d’Azur, leads you in the footsteps of some of the Riviera’s most celebrated creative residents and visitors, including Picasso, Chagall, Monet, Renoir and Bonnard. With the itinerary as a guide, you can visit the towns where they painted: Le Cannet, Mougins, St-Paul-de-Vence, Cagnes-sur-Mer, Nice, Villefranche-sur-Mer and Menton. Each point has a board erected on the spot where the artist set up their easel, a reproduction of the painting and accompanying information. The itinerary can be downloaded from the Riviera Côte d’Azur website, http://www.guideriviera.com.

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